©Prince Gyasi, The last one

During confinement you can find the works of the gallery on his website

Little by little, the Nil Gallery is making a place for itself in the contemporary African art market, which has been booming for 5 years. Emerging artists from the black continent are not the only ones represented there. But alongside visual artists from Asia or Poland, they hold the upper hand on rue des Coutures-Saint-Gervais, adjacent to the Picasso Museum.

Here we admire contemporary figurative and pop artists, often original and spectacular, never miserabilist. The audacious programming of Paul William and Hugo Zeitoun, two thirty-year-old gallery owners, is, on the contrary, representative of a joyful Afro-optimism.

So it is with the Ghanaian Prince Gyasin that in 2018, Vanity Fair ranked among the list of 9 avant-garde visual artists to follow. Apple, for its part, is collaborating with this 23-year-old young man based in Accra, who works on a lively chromatic palette in flat monochrome areas in tune with our century.

His “colorblock” photos taken using an iPhone or a digital Fuji push the saturation to the maximum and explore the color chart of black skin by celebrating their photogenicity. Like Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944), Prince Gyasina has the particularity of being synesthetic: he is one of those rare people capable of “ visualize sounds », who are " listen to colors », and associate colors with emotions.

©Prince Gyasin, Restoration

©Prince Gyasin, Projection

Another revelation, the autodidact Alimi Adewale, Nigerian artist whose work evokes social issues: unemployment, neglected youth, mortality, freedom of expression, political oppression. Between traditional African sculpture and contemporary art, the minimalist faces (€18/pair) of this ex-engineer question issues at the heart of society.

Finally, the tables ofAbé Odedina, also from Nigeria, recall the complex and subtle world of her fellow writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Focused on Yoruba cultures, the work on wood of this artist who lives between London and Salvador Bahia (Brazil) revisits classic themes on the border of Greek and Yoruba mythologies. His paintings (from €5000) are part of various major international collections, including the British Government Art Collection and the fashion designer (and collector) Agnès B.

Nile Gallery
14 Rue des Coutures Saint-Gervais, 75003 Paris
Monday to Friday, 13 p.m. to 19:30 p.m.
Tel: +01 44 54 04 07

Text: Katia Barillot

02.11.20

With the artist Malacarne, we dive into the Big Blue

With the artist Malacarne, we dive into the Big Blue

Why go to the sea when you can find it in le Marais, at the Menouar gallery, rue du Parc-Royal? Here, we dive directly into the Big Blue with the work of Malacarne, a post-impressionist artist of reflection, light and water whose brush caresses the surface of the sea.

Susumu Shingu, praise of slowness

Susumu Shingu, praise of slowness

At the Jeanne Bucher Jaeger gallery, a century-old space at the bottom of a courtyard, around thirty drawings and kinetic sculptures, moving works by the Japanese artist Susumu Shingu, are displayed. It was a trend in vogue in the 1950s, led by artists such as the Athenian Takis or the Brazilian Soto.

Ethan Murrow and his hymn to plants

Ethan Murrow and his hymn to plants

The Girls of Calvaire gallery, sheltered at the back of a courtyard, is hosting the solo show “Magic Soil” by the American Ethan Murrow until November 25. A unique set of around fifteen paintings and drawings that pay homage to nature.

July 14: where to see the Olympic flame in le Marais

July 14: where to see the Olympic flame in le Marais

Twelve days before the opening ceremony of the 2024 Olympic Games, the Olympic flame will cross Paris up and down for two days, not forgetting any district, on July 14 and 15. She will arrive in le Marais on July 14 in the afternoon from around 16 p.m. and until 16:46 p.m. sharp.

Oysters and fish: P'tit Mousse knows his job

Oysters and fish: P'tit Mousse knows his job

Why bother going to Wepler or La Coupole, when there is P'tit Mousse? Both an oyster bar and a fish restaurant, this address on Rue Rambuteau advantageously replaces the Parisian brasseries on Place Clichy and Boulevard Montparnasse.

Breton house, Brittany rue de Rivoli

Breton house, Brittany rue de Rivoli

A stone's throw from the Saint-Paul metro station and a stone's throw from the BHV, a little piece of Brittany has just been established. At the helm of this new ship, chef France. Originally from Finistère, she has been making crepes for over 20 years, so after experiencing the takeaway kiosk – Food Breizh on the banks of the Seine…

WHAAAAAAAT?!

 

All your friends tell you about the Marais Mood newsletter but you haven't received it?

Sign up here to receive weekly news from your favorite neighborhood. ☆

Welcome ! You are subscribed to the Marais Mood newsletter!