Ali Eniss, The New Mosque, Modern print from a glass negative, mahJ (l.) – Paul Zepdji, Salonician Jew, Albumen test mahJ (dr.)

For some, the memory of vacations in Greece is not very far away. But for everyone, the possibility of returning there immediately is open to us. The Museum of Art and History of Judaism (MahJ) is devoting an exhibition to Salonika – today called Thessaloniki – the port city on the Aegean Sea, 300 kilometers north of Athens, which was long nicknamed the “Jerusalem of the Balkans”.

A cosmopolitan city, like other major ports in the Levant, Salonika – Greek Thessalonica under the Ottoman Empire – was for a long time a Jewish city where traders of all faiths closed on Saturdays and during Jewish holidays. In 1492, following the expulsion of Jews from Spain, the first refugees came to settle in the city. At the end of the 20th century, there were nearly 000.

Ali Eniss, Landing stage facing Place de l’Olympe, Modern print from a glass negative, mahJ

At the beginning of the 120th century, Salonika was a multi-ethnic city: it had around 000 inhabitants, including 80 Jews, 000 Turks and 15 Greeks, 000 Bulgarians and 15 Westerners. After the First World War and the end of the Ottoman Empire, Salonika was integrated into the Greek state.

Thanks to the donation from Pierre de Gigord, a great collector devoted to the history of the Ottoman Empire, the MahJ is able to revive a vanished world, that of Salonika, over a period from 1870 to 1920.

Pascal Sebah, Jewish woman in studio, 1875, Print on albumen paper, mahJ

“The great fire of August 1917 represented an authentic trauma for the Jews who saw their historic neighborhoods, the communal archives and more than thirty synagogues swept away by the flames,” recalls the MahJ, whose exhibition (150 photos) occupies the space located in the basement of the museum. A magnificent book signed Catherine Pinguer, published by CNRS éditions, accompanies this historical retrospective soberly entitled Salonika, 1870-1920.

Exhibition “Salonika, 1870-1920”
Museum of Art and History of Judaism (MahJ)
71, rue du Temple, 75004 Paris
Tuesday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 18 p.m.
Closed on Mondays
Tel: 01 53 01 86 53

Ali Eniss, Children walking along the walls, Modern print from a celluloid negative, mahJ

Text: Axel G.

28.09.23

THERE ARE LOTS OF MUSEUMS HERE

Annie Ernaux, the literature of reality at the MEP

Annie Ernaux, the literature of reality at the MEP

The 2022 Nobel Prize-winning writer has been interested in photography for a long time, notably in the text “the use of photography”, a four-handed story published in 2006. At the European House of Photography, on the banks of the Seine , the exhibition Exteriors - Annie Ernaux & Photography flourishes until May 26, 2024.

The Weegee enigma, extreme photographer

The Weegee enigma, extreme photographer

American photojournalist from the 1930s and 50s, famous for his black and white photos of nightlife in New York, Weegee takes this nickname as a nod to the spirit board, the Ouija board. Because he proclaims himself a “psychic photographer” with the 3rd eye.

Joann Sfar featured at MAHJ

Joann Sfar featured at MAHJ

Who doesn’t know the comic strip “The Rabbi’s Cat”? Its creator, Joann Sfar, was born in Nice in 1971. In this retrospective at the Museum of Art and History of Judaism in the heart of the Marais, the first of its kind, we will see many original plates presented in images by the famous cat .

July 14: where to see the Olympic flame in le Marais

July 14: where to see the Olympic flame in le Marais

Twelve days before the opening ceremony of the 2024 Olympic Games, the Olympic flame will cross Paris up and down for two days, not forgetting any district, on July 14 and 15. She will arrive in le Marais on July 14 in the afternoon from around 16 p.m. and until 16:46 p.m. sharp.

Oysters and fish: P'tit Mousse knows his job

Oysters and fish: P'tit Mousse knows his job

Why bother going to Wepler or La Coupole, when there is P'tit Mousse? Both an oyster bar and a fish restaurant, this address on Rue Rambuteau advantageously replaces the Parisian brasseries on Place Clichy and Boulevard Montparnasse.

Breton house, Brittany rue de Rivoli

Breton house, Brittany rue de Rivoli

A stone's throw from the Saint-Paul metro station and a stone's throw from the BHV, a little piece of Brittany has just been established. At the helm of this new ship, chef France. Originally from Finistère, she has been making crepes for over 20 years, so after experiencing the takeaway kiosk – Food Breizh on the banks of the Seine…

WHAAAAAAAT?!

 

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